• Users Online: 116
  • Print this page
  • Email this page


 
 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 65

Are psychosocial problems adequately investigated in pediatric glioma?


1 Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Psychiatric Social Work, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Date of Web Publication21-Sep-2018

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Raju Birudu
Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/oji.oji_24_18

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Birudu R, Kanmani T R. Are psychosocial problems adequately investigated in pediatric glioma?. Oncol J India 2018;2:65

How to cite this URL:
Birudu R, Kanmani T R. Are psychosocial problems adequately investigated in pediatric glioma?. Oncol J India [serial online] 2018 [cited 2018 Dec 11];2:65. Available from: http://www.ojionline.org/text.asp?2018/2/3/65/241840



Dear Sir,

I have read a case report carefully with interest which recently published in your esteemed journal tilted on “Glioblastoma multiforme in a pediatric child.”[1] Having first-hand work experience in neurosurgical setting working with glioma patients as a medical and psychiatric social worker (MPSW), We would like to appreciate the authors to bring forth the importance of treatment for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) especially for children. The case report highlighted the presentation of symptoms of a child, performance status, size of the tumor, investigations done and its relevance, postoperative status, current treatment receiving, future plans of treatment such as chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy by temozolomide and lomustine, future role of genetic aberration and immunology in the management of GBM, limitation of temozolomide, research evidence on current survival rates among children, and prognostic factors among pediatric GBM.

Information on cognitive functions, performance status before and after surgery, child's understanding and perceptions on illness, experience, coping, resilience, illness behavior, and feedback on treating team communication with the child would have been explored since higher mental functions are intact in the child. In addition, pathway of care, parental understanding and knowledge on nature of illness, expectations on prognosis, parental distress, economic status, and parenting styles would have strengthened the case report from holistic care perspective.

Nevertheless, adherence of treatment regimen, school functioning, academic achievement, behavioral problems, community quality of life, parents and caregivers mental health issues looking after glioma children, in particular high-grade gliomas are poorly investigated. In our clinical observation as MPSW practitioners, pediatric glioma children's functional status after discharge is generally neglected. There are the potential areas to be explored to identify the psychosocial needs of children having glioma by health care providers (HCPs). Pediatric brain tumor patients have unique needs in treatment stage, survival stage, and end-of-life care stage. Further investigation on knowledge of unique aspects of care for children with brain tumors and appropriate interventions are suggested to improve the quality of life.[2]

The above-mentioned are few potential variables for psychosocial research in pediatric glioma but forgotten by many HCPs in neurosurgery and neuro-oncology setting. To conclude, this case report is unique to understand the importance of treatment for pediatric GBM. There is an immediate need to initiate psychosocial research on academic, emotional, behavioral, functional and psychosocial needs of children having glioma during treatment, during survival phase, and at end-of-life care in India.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Mishra S, Patnaik A, Majumdar SK, Parida DK. Glioblastoma multiforme in a pediatric child. Oncol J India 2018;2:38-40.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Fischer C, Petriccione M, Donzelli M, Pottenger E. Improving care in pediatric neuro-oncology patients: An overview of the unique needs of children with brain tumors. J Child Neurol 2016;31:488-505.  Back to cited text no. 2
    




 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article
References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed160    
    Printed6    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded30    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal


[TAG2]
[TAG3]
[TAG4]